Switching from Windows Phone to Android: Yes, this time is personal [TL;DR]

windows-8-vs-androidAs some of you might have recognized, I have been using the Android LG G4 as my daily driver for more than a month now. And as you might expect, at some point, I will do a comparison between the G4 and the Lumia ICON, or even bigger, Android vs. Windows Phone. In some way, this is that piece. But for my intention, it is not. My intention is to, as a Windows Phone user, experience the change in my daily driver, and my feeling on the new OS. With that being said, I can only control my intention. How you, the reader, receives it, is a different story. I just want you to keep in mind that this is not a piece to bash Android or Windows Phone, but to observe what I (emphasizing that as much as possible) think recognized, I have been using the Android LG G4 as my daily driver for more than a month now. And as you might expect, at some point, I will do a comparison between the G4 and the Lumia ICON, or even bigger, Android vs. Windows Phone. In some way, this is that piece. But for my intention, it is not. My intention is to, as a Windows Phone user, experience the change in my daily driver, and my feeling on the new OS. With that being said, I can only control my intention. How you, the reader, receives it, is a different story. I just want you to keep in mind that this is not a piece to bash Android or Windows Phone, but to observe what I (emphasizing that as much as possible) think of the strength and weakness of one OS compare to another.

Moving to Android: A weird kind of freedom

But it’s the right kind of weird. To be clear, the LG G4 is not the first Android phone I have been using this year; the Nexus 5 was my first return to Android, (possibly at the worst time, however, but more on that later), and my feeling since then has changed. Unlike most Android users, I don’t like the bare-bones OS. Not that I have anything against it, but I just find the bare-bones to be quite dull after awhile. So, with LG G4, I was explicitly paying much attention to how did the company take advantage of the open-source OS. And may I say, the Korean company did an excellent job.

As unattractive as the LG skin is, the addition software is very useful. Smart Card serves its purpose, warn me to carry an umbrella or an app that is draining the battery. The addition of an IR port for a virtual remote control and just the sheer customizability provides by Android is incredible.

Not to mention the significant issue: Apps. If you ever use a Windows Phone for more than a month, you know the pain. Even with more than 300,000 apps on the store, it is still a huge issue. The fact is apps like Snapchat, with more than 100 million users, is not on Windows Phone is a huge downside. Furthermore, the non-existence of essential apps like YouTube or any Google apps is an ache against Microsoft and the growth for the mobile platform itself.

But it is not Windows Phone…

And as good as Android is, it’s not Windows Phone. In aesthetic and in execution, there were just a few things that Windows Phone and Microsoft do better than Android.

Remember the what I said about this being the worst time? The explanation is simple: Android Lollipop. Despite all the great things that Lollipop brings, the result is instability. As reported by many sites, Lollipop is filled with memory and battery management problems. The fact is:, the LG G4 and even earlier, the Nexus 5, all bogged down within the first month of using.

One explanation might just be part of my habit of using Windows Phone. Navigation-wise, when I press back, Windows took me to the Start screen and closed my apps at the same time. On Android, however, the method is different. Pushing back or home while taking you back to home, does not turn off your apps. And I learned that even regular Android users always forgot to turn off their apps and end up having those apps drain all their juice. As annoying as that is, it is certainly not the worst thing.home, does not turn off your apps. And I learned that even regular Android users always forgot to turn off their apps and end up having those apps drain all their juice. As annoying as that is, it is certainly not the worst thing.

The real problem is the RAM management, which regularly causes the app crash.  Don’t get me wrong, all operating systems have this problem. However, I’d argue that Microsoft is the best since Lollipop released. What the OS does is stopped the apps that got pushed back to the background, and when you switch back, the OS takes a second to “Resume” the app. On the other hand, Lollipop tries to take on all the apps and crashes all of them; or at least, bogs down the whole phones. Now, are these the best solutions? Obviously not, one good example is how great iOS handle multitasking. But if I have to choose, I’d choose the one that won’t crash my phoneapps and crashes all of them; or at least, bogs down the whole phones. Now, are these the best solutions? Obviously not, one good example is how great iOS handle multitasking. But if I have to choose, I’d choose the one that won’t crash my phone.stopped the apps that got pushed back to the background, and when you switch back, the OS takes a second to “Resume” the app. On the other hand, Lollipop tries to take on all the .stopped the apps that got pushed back to the background, and when you switch back, the OS takes a second to “Resume” the app. On the other hand, Lollipop tries to take on all the apps and crashes all of them; or at least, bog down the whole phones. Now, are these the best solutions? Obviously not, one good example is how great iOS handle multitasking. But if I have to choose, I’d choose the one that won’t crash my phone.

Lastly, is in aesthetic. Now, this particular category is of course very subjective. Let’s be honest here, the question you guys want me to answer is Widget or Live Tiles. The thing is, they both have their strength. The widget allows you to interact with the apps without even enter them while Tile displays information in a simple, yet elegant way of it. Personally, I prefer the Live Tiles over the Widget, but again, is a personal reference.In aesthetic. Now, this particular category is of course very subjective. Let’s be honest here, the question you guys want me to answer is Widget or Live Tiles. The thing is, they both have their .In aesthetic. Now, this particular category is of course very subjective. Let’s be honest here, the question you guys want me to answer is Widget or Live Tiles. The thing is, they both have their strength. The widget allows you to interact with the apps without even enter them while Tile displays information in a simple, yet elegant way of it. Personally, I prefer the Live Tiles over the Widget, but again, is a personal reference.strength. The widget allows you to interact with the apps without even enter them while .strength. The widget allows you to interact with the apps without even enter them while Tile displays information in a simple, yet elegant way of it. Personally, I prefer the Live Tiles over the Widget, but again, is a personal reference.Tile displays information in a simple, yet elegant way of it. Personally, I prefer the Live Tiles over the Widget, but again, is a personal reference. Tile displays information in a simple, yet elegant way of it. Personally, I prefer the Live Tiles over the Widget, but again, is a personal reference.

The bottom line

Once again, this is not a bashing piece on anyone. But the problems that were pointed out are real. Now, this is from the perspective of a Windows Phone. However, if Android wants to draw more customers from other platforms, they have to fix these problems, and fast. Windows Mobile 10 and iOS 8 has come out, and Android Marshmallow 6.0 better be ready to combat them.anyone. But the problems that were pointed out are real. Now, this is from the perspective of a Windows Phone. However, if Android wants to draw more customers from other platforms, they have to fix these problems, and fast. Windows Mobile 10 and iOS 8 has come out, and Android Marshmallow 6.0 better be ready to combat them..anyone. But the problems that were pointed out are real. Now, this is from the perspective of a Windows Phone. However, if Android wants to draw more customers from other platforms, they have to fix these problems, and fast. Windows Mobile 10 and iOS 8 has come out, and Android Marshmallow 6.0 better be ready to combat them.

As for Microsoft and Windows. It’s clear that now with Windows 10 being the central focus point, Windows Mobile 10 has to bring it home. More importantly, Microsoft seems to forget about why people bought into their Windows Phone in the first place, and it is the time that they can’t afford to do that.

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